Why we believe in nature- based solutions

We believe in regeneration, that nature is resilient and will always work to re-establish its natural balance, but in her time. We can help speed up that process by mimicking nature, observing and copying what is there for centuries and creating life. That is why we look for nature based solutions.

We believe in nature-based solutions because of the multiple co-benefits it has for both people and the planet.

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Benefits of Nature-Based Solutions and their impact

Global warming is primarily driven by carbon dioxide (CO₂), water vapor, and methane. Human activities such as burning fossil fuels, deforestation, and industrial agriculture contribute to these greenhouse gasses. Nature based Carbon removal solutions not only remove carbon from the atmosphere but contribute to many additional benefits.

One.

Carbon Sequestration

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Photosynthesis: With the help of sunlight, plants absorb CO₂ and store carbon in above-ground biomass and in the soil through their interactions with microbes.

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Grazing Practices: Allowing cows to graze on grass reduces methane emissions and enhances carbon removal as plants grow faster after grazing.

Two.

Temperature Regulation

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Vegetation: Provides shade, reducing local temperatures by more than 10°C in some cases.

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Transpiration: Water evaporation from plants cools the surrounding environment.

Three.

Water Management

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Water Cycle: Dense forests and vegetation improve water storage and create rainfall, reducing the greenhouse effect of water vapor.

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Soil Restoration: Increased vegetation enriches soil with organic matter, enhancing water retention.

Four.

Soil and Ecosystem Health

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Soil Fertility: Regenerating soil turns barren land fertile without the need for pesticides.

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Ecosystem Restoration: Boosting biodiversity and managing water cycles helps restore ecosystems and combat desertification.

Five.

Air Quality and Food Production

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Air Cleaning: Vegetation reduces CO2, methane, and other greenhouse gasses, while ensuring healthy oxygen levels.

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Healthier Food: Regenerative practices produce nutrient-rich food without additional pesticides.

Six.

Climate Adaptation and Resilience

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Flood Mitigation: Healthy soil absorbs more water, making land more resilient to floods and heavy rains.

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Community Resilience: Nature-based solutions foster stronger, more adaptable communities.

No Additional Harm

Nature-based solutions not only mitigate climate change by reducing greenhouse gasses but also provide numerous co-benefits without causing additional harm.

Nature-based is cheaper and doesn’t require extra energy. Nature-based solutions (NbS) are currently more effective and economical compared to many other climate mitigation strategies. At present, they are cheaper because they utilize natural processes such as reforestation, wetland restoration, and sustainable agriculture, which require lower financial investments and minimal reliance on energy or fossil fuels. In contrast, many technological solutions need to scale significantly before they become cost-effective. This makes NbS a more viable and immediate option for addressing climate change, biodiversity loss, and land degradation, providing substantial benefits at a lower cost.

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Tripling NbS Investments by 2030: A Call to Action

On May 30, 2021, the "State of Finance for Nature" report revealed that investments in nature-based solutions (NbS) must triple by 2030 from current levels to effectively address the interconnected crises of climate change, biodiversity loss, and land degradation.

Achieving this will require economic stimulus packages more sustainable, repurposing harmful agricultural and fossil fuel subsidies, and creating additional economic and regulatory incentives. Despite the urgent need for increased investment in nature-based solutions to tackle climate change, biodiversity loss, and land degradation, only a small fraction—2.5%—of the projected economic stimulus spending is being directed towards these crucial initiatives. This highlights a significant gap between the required financial support and the actual allocations being made.

The report also indicates that investments in NbS need to increase four-fold by 2050 compared to current levels, using 2018 as a baseline.

We are here to offer a helping hand.We are here to offer a helping hand.

What nature-based solutions DO WE REPRESENT?

Our nature-based carbon removal credits come from carbon storage on land, in oceans, in rocks, and within bio-based building projects, all aimed at removing CO₂, restoring ecosystems and making biodiversity the norm.

Land Based Carbon Removal Solutions

Ocean Based Carbon Removal Solutions

Rock Based Carbon Removal Solutions

Construction Based Carbon Removal Solutions

Land-based Carbon Removal Solutions

Our approach to healing the Earth is rooted in science and a deep respect for ecosystems. Each project is tailored to promote biodiversity, improve water retention, and ensure ecosystems are vibrant and balanced, utilizing polyculture and native species. Below you can read more about the different land based carbon removal technologies:

Abandoned Farmland Restoration

Imagine turning vast stretches of unused, degraded farmland back into thriving agricultural lands. By 2050, we could transform up to 296.12 million hectares of such land through practices like regenerative farming. This could cut down as much as 20.32 gigatons of CO₂ emissions and produce an extra 15 billion metric tons of food. It's about reviving these lands so they can support crops again, helping the environment and boosting food supply. For example, converting an old, unused farm into a vibrant place that grows a mix of crops and supports diverse wildlife shows the power of this restoration.

See our carbon farmer Bart van Beuzekom in Portugal with his project Scave.

Managed Grazing

Managed grazing is like a makeover for the way we let animals graze. By carefully managing how, when, and where livestock graze, we can actually help the land heal and store more carbon—up to 20.92 gigatons by 2050. It's about letting grasslands recover, which not only stores carbon but also supports more plants and animals. Think of a pasture that once was bare and degraded, now full of life and healthier soils just by changing how and how many animals graze there.

Multistrata Agroforestry

This approach is like creating a mini-forest where crops and trees live together. It can sequester up to 23.94 gigatons of CO₂ by 2050. By growing crops under the canopy of trees, we mimic natural forests, which helps store carbon and supports biodiversity. An example could be a coffee farm under the shade of native trees, which not only helps the environment but also produces great coffee.

See our carbon farmer Robert and Dace in Brazil with their project MAARA.

Bamboo Production

Bamboo is a super plant when it comes to carbon storage, with the potential to sequester up to 19.6 gigatons of CO₂ by 2050. By planting bamboo on degraded lands, we not only restore those lands but also create a renewable resource that can be used for everything from building materials to clothing. A bamboo plantation on land that was once barren can become a lush, green area that's also a carbon storage powerhouse.

See our carbon farmer van der Borne, who in collaboration with Bamboologic has converted some hectares of his potato fields into bamboo forests.

Perennial Biomass Production

Switching to perennial plants for biomass can lead to a reduction of up to 7.04 gigatons of CO₂ emissions by 2050. Perennials, like switchgrass or miscanthus, grow back every year, reducing the need for replanting and helping the soil store more carbon. An old cornfield turned into a perennial biomass farm can become a source of renewable energy, while also acting as a carbon sink.

Silvopasture

Silvopasture, integrating trees with pastures, is a sustainable farming superhero. Trees in pastures sequester 5-10 times more carbon than treeless pastures and boost productivity. Currently practiced on 550 million hectares, expanding silvopasture to 720-772 million hectares by 2050 could cut CO₂ emissions by 26-42 gigatons. Imagine lush pastures with trees providing shade, shelter, and producing nuts, fruits, and mushrooms. This practice not only stores carbon but also diversifies farmers' income. Despite challenges, silvopasture helps farmers adapt to climate change, making it vital for a sustainable future. Protecting and expanding silvopasture enhances carbon storage and agricultural resilience.

Tropical Forest Restoration

Tropical forests are vital for carbon sequestration but have been extensively degraded. Restoring 161-231 million hectares of degraded tropical land could sequester 54-85 gigatons of CO₂ by 2050. Restoration involves natural forest regrowth, protecting areas from fire, erosion, and grazing. This low-cost process results in rapid carbon capture. Intensive techniques like planting native seedlings and removing invasive species can also be used.

Beyond carbon storage, tropical forest restoration conserves biodiversity, protects watersheds, and offers benefits like food, medicine, and sustainable living spaces. Protecting and restoring these forests is essential for mitigating climate change and enhancing ecosystem resilience.

Conservation Agriculture

Conservation agriculture uses cover crops, crop rotation, and minimal tilling to protect soil, reduce emissions, and sequester carbon. This enhances soil health and reduces nutrient pollution.

Expanding conservation agriculture from 148 million hectares to 400-327 million hectares by 2035 could cut CO₂ equivalent emissions by 8.08-12.81 gigatons. Its principles—minimizing soil disturbance, protecting soil with vegetation, and rotating crops—reduce greenhouse gases and increase land resilience to climate events. By adopting these practices, farmers create more sustainable and productive systems.

See our carbon farmer Erwin Westers in the Netherlands applying reduced tilling and cover crops with their project Horaholm.

Ocean based Carbon Removal Solutions

Our ocean-based initiatives harness marine ecosystems for environmental restoration, focusing on seagrass meadows, sargassum and other seaweeds. These underwater plants are carbon storage powerhouses, outperforming terrestrial forests in their capacity to sequester CO₂. We're exploring their potential for carbon absorption, offering promising paths for ocean-based carbon removal. These efforts not only capture CO₂ but also bolster marine biodiversity, improve water clarity, and support healthy ocean ecosystems.

Seaweed Farming

Seaweed farming is like setting up an underwater garden where seaweeds grow. It's a super sustainable way to farm, and by doing more of it, we can lock away 4.72 gigatons of CO₂ by 2050. Imagine vast underwater fields of seaweed that not only capture carbon but also give us biofuel, bioplastics, and even food. It's all about growing seaweed in the ocean and letting some of it sink to the deep sea, where it keeps the carbon stored away.

See our carbon farmer Magnus Willner and Carl Lindberg growing and sinking kelp plants into the deep oceans with their project Arbon Earth.

Macroalgae Protection and Restoration

Macroalgae, crucial for carbon sequestration, are declining. Protecting 160–199 million hectares by 2050 could sequester 1.84–2.28 gigatons of CO₂, while restoring 14–26 million hectares adds 0.77–1.50 gigatons.

Restoration, involving protection and planting, boosts climate resilience and marine biodiversity.

Macroalgae forests also provide marine habitats and combat coastal erosion, crucial for climate mitigation and ocean health.

Coastal Wetland Restoration

Coastal wetlands, like mangroves and salt marshes, are vital for carbon sequestration but are severely degraded. Restoring 6-7 million hectares by 2050 could sequester 0.76-1.00 gigatons of CO₂.

These wetlands store five times more carbon than tropical forests, primarily in deep soils, and sequester carbon for centuries. Restoration supports biodiversity and ecosystem services.

These wetlands store five times more carbon than tropical forests, primarily in deep soils, and sequester carbon for centuries. Restoration supports biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Rock based Carbon Removal Solutions

Rock-based carbon removal solutions refer to methods that use minerals and rocks to capture and store CO₂ from the atmosphere. These solutions typically involve processes like mineral carbonation and enhanced rock weathering. Naturally, this process takes a lot of time, but we can speed up the natural removal process by finely grinding the rocks and spreading them over large areas, thereby increasing the surface area for chemical reactions to occur more rapidly.

Rock Weathering

Rock weathering in carbon removal refers to the natural breakdown of rocks due to water and air exposure, absorbing CO₂ and forming carbonates.

This process acts as a long-term carbon sink, storing carbon for thousands to millions of years, and helps regulate Earth's climate by balancing atmospheric CO₂ levels. Enhancing rock weathering as a carbon removal strategy can mitigate climate change and promote sustainability.

Construction Based Carbon Removal Solutions

Construction-stored carbon refers to the carbon dioxide (CO₂) that is captured and stored within building materials and structures. This concept is part of sustainable construction practices aimed at reducing the overall carbon footprint of buildings. By using nature-based materials like timber, bamboo, hempcrete, straw bales, and mycelium-based materials, construction can effectively sequester carbon, contributing to climate change mitigation and promoting sustainability in the built environment.

Construction Stored Carbon

Construction-stored carbon refers to the carbon dioxide (CO₂) that is captured and stored within building materials and structures. This concept is part of sustainable construction practices aimed at reducing the overall carbon footprint of buildings.

By using nature-based materials like timber, bamboo, hempcrete, straw bales, and mycelium-based materials, construction can effectively sequester carbon, contributing to climate change mitigation and promoting sustainability in the built environment.

See our carbon farmer Eric in the Netherlands, growing Paulownia forests for the local production of biobased products.

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